Astrology and Skeptics: When An Opinion Is Not A Fact

2921288464_fec22107eb_z (Astrology Explored) It started innocently enough with a person asking an astrologer to read his palm. I declined to do this, but a skeptic weighed in with this response:

My advice is that you do not attach any significance whatsoever to anybody who claim to be able to tell the future by reading palms, the stars, etc. Palmistry and astrology is pseudoscientific nonsense and it has been thoroughly debunked scientifically.

To which I replied:

Please cite the scientific papers that support your claims.

And this is the response I received:

Comment: “The scientific community rejects astrology as having no explanatory power for describing the universe, and consider it a pseudoscience. Scientific testing of astrology has been conducted, and no evidence has been found to support any of the premises or purported effects outlined in astrological traditions. There is no proposed mechanism of action by which the positions and motions of stars and planets could affect people and events on Earth that does not contradict well understood, basic aspects of biology and physics. Those who continue to have faith in astrology have been characterized as doing so “…in spite of the fact that there is no verified scientific basis for their beliefs, and indeed that there is strong evidence to the contrary.”

Kindly see citations at the bottom:

en-wikipedia-org/wiki/Astrology

So, of course, I had to respond.

1.) Comment:”The scientific community rejects astrology as having no explanatory power for describing the universe, and consider it a pseudoscience.”

It is not the entire scientific community that rejects astrology, but a specific group that promotes the rejection of anything they consider supernatural. This group us the Humanists who promote atheism. Anything other than a rejection of God or any “supernatural” force is unacceptable to the Humanists. I wrote about here:

Astrology and the Skeptics: Debunkers Tool of a Religious Agenda?

And here:

Atheists, Humanists and Astrology: What You Should Know

2.) Scientific testing of astrology has been conducted, and no evidence has been found to support any of the premises or purported effects outlined in astrological traditions

Again, this assertion that is patently untrue. I wrote about that here:

Astrology and the Skeptics: An Open Letter to Dr. Rebekah Higgitt

3.) There is no proposed mechanism of action by which the positions and motions of stars and planets could affect people and events on Earth that does not contradict well understood, basic aspects of biology and physics.

Then you are behind in your understanding of quantum physics. You can read my article here:

Astrology and Science: Scientific Determinism’s Dangerous Ground

4.) Those who continue to have faith in astrology have been characterized as doing so “…in spite of the fact that there is no verified scientific basis for their beliefs, and indeed that there is strong evidence to the contrary.”

I refer you again to point 2.

5.) Kindly see citations at the bottom:

en-wikipedia-org/wiki/Astrology”

Lest you think that Wikipedia Editor has presented a true account of astrology, you can read my recounting of the edit war against the people who are best qualified to present astrology—astrologers.

Wikipedia’s War Against Astrology: Jimmy Wales–Are You Listening?

Again, I invite you to provide direct scientific proof that astrology is false, from qualified, unbiased scientists. I’m sincerely interested in that. I’ve been unable to find same, but perhaps you have access to sources that I do not. In the meantime, I submit that you’ve only provided an opinion, which is your right. But opinion is not scientific evidence. Otherwise, we’d still believe the earth is flat.

Sincerely,

Beth Turnage

Photo published under a Creative Commons license from Flickr user Marcin Chady

The #Astrology of the Red Blood Moon Eclipse

Red Blood Moon

April 4, 2015 Red Blood Moon

(Astrology Explored) WANTED: Reliable end of the world prophecy. False prophets need not apply.

Since the time man started to parse the heavens, we’ve used the stars as an excuse to proclaim God’s (or gods’) righteousness will descend upon us on such and such a date.

Wikipedia tells us:

The idea of a “blood moon” serving as an omen of the coming of the end times comes from the Book of Joel, where it is written “the sun will turn into darkness, and the moon into blood, before the great and terrible day of theLORD comes.”[4] This phrase is again mentioned by Saint Peter during Pentecost, as recorded in Acts,[5] although Peter says that date, not some future date, was the fulfillment of Joel’s prophecy. The blood moon also appears in the book of Revelation chapter 6 verses 11 – 13, [6] where verse 12 says ” And I beheld when he had opened the sixth seal, and, lo, there was a great earthquake; and the sun became black as sackcloth of hair, and the moon became as blood.”

The is no different for the today’s Red Blood Moon, a brief lunar eclipse visible on the East Coast for barely an hour at dawn. Supposedly this particular blood moon has special significance: Continue reading

#Throwback Thursday: #Astrology & #Easter

(Astrology Explored)

Resurrection Stories of the Astrological Great Ages: Inanna

6,000 years before we memorialized our Easter celebration, the Sumerian culture had its own resurrection story. Containing the elements of death, redemption and resurrection it is the story of the Age of Gemini, whose essential nature is dualism.

Inanna was the Queen of Heaven of Sumerian culture associated with Venus, the morning and evening star, goddess of the fertility of the fields. The resurrection story, like the story of Persephone, ties the seasons into the actions of the gods.

The Sumerian year had 12-lunar-months, based upon phases of the moon and just two seasons.  Summer began on the vernal spring equinox, lasting 6-months through until the autumnal equinox.  Winter was the harvest season and outlined by monthly written characters for hand, seed, grain and cutting.

Her story is a journey of development and evolution. (Read More–>)

Continue reading

The #Astrology of the Solar System: Astronomers Go Too Far

Solar system to be named after Lord of the Rings characters

Planets Named After LOTR?

(Astrology Explored) It was bad enough the International Astronomy Union, upon the discovery of Sedna, went a little crazy and started reclassifying planets. Saying that size does matter, Pluto, the master of domination and control was reclassified a “dwarf planet.” Way to emasculate the lord of hell, IAU. Bad enough that the IAU cast out the perfectly lovely name of Xena and stuck that planet with the sucky name and mythology of Sedna. Now the CBBC (a division of the BBC) floated the information that astronomers are going to rename all the planets in the solar system after the characters in J.R.R. Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings. Continue reading