The Astrology of “Supermoons”: Thin Skinned Earth Shakes, Rattles and Rolls

Astro*carto*graphy chart May 2012 Supermoon(Astrology Explored) Even the moon’s orbit is slightly elliptical. Many of us know that the orbits of the planets are not perfect circles, but ellipses, circles that appear elongated. The astronomical event called a “supermoon” occurs when as astrologer Richard Nolle tells us “the Moon is at 90% or greater of its mean
closest approach to Earth (perigee).”

The dramatic result that the moon appears larger in the sky than at other times during the year. However, while it is a great visual display, most modern astrologers typically don’t ascribe meaning to the size the moon appears to be in the sky.

One astrologer who does watch supermoons, Richard Nolle is in the fact the person who coined that term. This is what he tells us about them:

SuperMoons are noteworthy for their close association with extreme tidal forces working in what astrologers of old used to call the sublunary world: the atmosphere, crust and oceans of our home planet – including ourselves, of course. From extreme coastal tides to severe storms to powerful earthquakes and volcanic eruptions, the entire natural world surges and spasms under the sway of the SuperMoon alignment – within three days either way of the exact syzygy, as a general rule. SuperMoon solar eclipses tend to have a wider sphere of impact, extending roughly a week before and after the actual event. And other lunar extremes (of declination, for example) can extend the geocosmic stress window by a day or two here and there in any case.

The USGS tell us this about the sublunary world:

“The distance from the surface of the Earth to its center is 3,700 miles. The thickness of the ocean lithosphere or the relatively solid skin of the earth under oceans is only 41 miles, which in relative terms is much thinner than the skin of an apple.” Continue reading