The Astrology of Venus in Scorpio

(Astrology Explored) Venus swings again into the heady sign of Scorpio on September 11. Yes, 9/11. There are no accidents. Venus in this placement sheds the party girl persona of Venus in Libra and gets dark, serious and seriously intense. A relationship starting during this time will test your limits of endurance, plunge the depths of how much you love and take you on a thrill ride that will either scare you or scar you. Oh, yes. It is that dramatic.

The only way to get through this time with your hide intact is to be brutally honest with yourself when you stare into the abyss. If you lie, well . . . you’ve been warned.

To give you more of a background of what Venus in Scorpio means I’m linking you back to my original series of posts on this theme. Featured is the original Mistress of the Dark herself, Persephone, and how her quest illuminates our own in searching the dark and the light.

First, however, a post about her handmaiden, advisor and wing man, Hecate.

Hecate —The “Dark” Goddess & The Space Between

The Astrology of Venus in Scorpio: Persephone and Pieces of Rose, Part 1

The Astrology of Venus in Scorpio: Persephone and Pieces of Rose, Part 2

The Astrology of Venus in Scorpio: Persephone and Pieces of Rose, Part 3


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The Astrology of Venus in Scorpio: Persephone and Pieces of Rose, Part 3

Hades and PersephonePersephone

(Astrology Explored) Daughter of immortal deities, called the Goddess of Spring, Persephone’s story is Scorpionic in nature. Her birth, her life and her eventual role as Queen of the Underworld speaks to us about unrelenting forces that transform our existence.

The French say, “Mama, yes; Papa, maybe” and certainly this is true in Persephone’s case. Some accounts have Neptune as her father, others, Zeus. As with all things Scorpionic, there is more than a little mystery involved here.

The daughter of Demeter was given more than one praise of her beauty in Greek literature. She was called “white armed” and “slimmed ankled”. As Persephone came into puberty, all the male gods vied for her hand in marriage a situation that was said to be sparked by Aphrodite (Venus) herself. Aphrodite became concerned that Persephone would turn out to live life as a virgin just as her cousins Artemis and Athena. She, in a moment of Plutonian overkill instructed her son Eros to let loose his arrows on every god in Olympus. Even Zeus was so struck by Persephone’s beauty that:

The ruler of the universe, the charioteer of heaven, bowed his neck to desire–for all his greatness no thunderbolts, no lightnings helped him against Aphrodite in arms: he left the house of Hera, he refused the bed of Dione, he threw away the love of Deo, he fled from Themis, he deserted Leto – no charm was left for him but only union with Persephoneia.

Demeter was so alarmed by all this attention towards her daughter, that she sought the advice of an astrologer, which I include here in its entirety because of the fascinating detail of the astrologer’s process.

She hastened with quick foot to the house of Astraios the god of prophecy [or more specifically astrology] . . . She laid her left hand on the knees of the kindly ancient, and with her right touched his deepflowing beard in supplication. She recounted all her daughter’s wooers and craved a comfortable oracle; for divinations can steal away anxieties by means of hopes to come. Nor did old Astraios refuse. He learnt the details of the day when her only child was new born, and the exact time and veritable course of the season which gave her birth; then he bent the turning fingers of his hands and measured the moving circle of the ever-recurring number counting from hand to hand in double exchange [reckoning the number of days in the years of her life on his fingers]. He called to a servant, and Asterion lifted a round revolving sphere, the shape of the sky, the image of the universe, and laid it upon the lid of a chest. Here the ancient got to work. He turned it upon its pivot, and directed this gaze round the circle of the Zodiac, scanning in this place and that the planets and fixt stars . . . When he had noticed everything and reckoned the circuit of the stars, he put away the ever-revolving sphere in its roomy box, the sphere with its curious surface; and in answer to the goddess he mouthed out a triple oracle of prophetic sound : `Fond mother Demeter, when the rays of the Moon are stolen under a shady cone and her light is gone, guard against a robber-bridegroom for Perephoneia, a secret ravisher of your unsmirched girl, if the threads of the Moirai can be persuaded. You will see before marriage a false and secret bedfellow come unforeseen, a half-monster cunning-minded: since I perceive the western point Ares the wife-stealer [the planet Mars] walking with the Paphian [the planet Venus], and I notice the Drakon is rising beside them both . . . ’

Concerned and alarmed by this prophecy she bore her daughter away in a chariot drawn by dragons to a secret cave. The dragons were then given the task of protecting Persephone. All seeing Zeus however, found the hiding place, and transforming himself into a dragon, seducing Persephone with cunning. He lured the girl into a sleep by surrounding her with his soft coils and sweet kisses. Their union produced Zagreus, who by virtue of his father’s deception, was born In the snake like shape of a dragon. Zeus took this child to Olympus, intending to set him on the throne of heaven, but the Titans rebelled against Zeus decision and tore the child into pieces. Grief stricken Zeus put the pieces of Zagreus’ heart in a drink and gave it to Semele, the moon goddess to drink. She became pregnant with this genetic material and bore to Zeus, the god Dionysis, known to the Romans as Bacchus, another god whose mystery religion was revolved around transformation through the consumption of wine. Thus Persephone was associated with two mystery religions, that of the Eleusian Mysteries and the rites of Dionysis.

Persephone herself was forever transformed by her foray into the Underworld. On the surface, Persephone can be viewed as a voiceless victim. Her fate is decided by Zeus, her husband and her mother. But Pluto is seductive for sure. Unlike Zeus, Pluto is intent on making her a permanent fixture in his life. He makes solemn pledges to her:

“… I shall be no unfitting husband for you among the deathless gods, that am own brother to father Zeus. And while you are here, you shall rule all that lives and moves and shall have the greatest rights among the deathless gods: those who defraud you and do not appease your power with offerings, reverently performing rites and paying fit gifts, shall be punished for evermore.” (Hades to Persephone, Homeric Hymn to Demeter 2.363).

Was it the power that Pluto offered that ultimately seduced her, or was it the dark charm of lord of the Underworld? Those among us who have experience of love that can not be denied know the addictive nature of such relationships. Whether by one or both, Persephone is initiated in to the sexual world as a wife.

There is evidence that Persephone’s own nature may have had an manipulative element to it. Persephone blamed Hades for the consumption of the pomegranate seeds, telling her mother that he secretly forced the seeds in her mouth. Yet how he “secretly forced the seeds” in to her mouth is yet another story. She would have needed to take the food willingly for the doom of Hades to fall upon her.

There are other stories of Persephone’s Scorpionic nature. When Venus gave Persephone the youth Adonis to care for, the dark goddess was just as enthralled as Venus with his beauty and refused to give him back.

Hades had one affair, with the nymph Menthe, who jealous Persephone trampled and transformed in the mint plant. (Crushed mint was added to a drink made of grain that was said to be drunk by her mother Demeter, and possibly was served during the enactment of the Eleusian Mysteries). Clearly, Persephone was not about to share her dark husband with anyone. Hades was not known to step out on her again.

And despite her initial (and probably faint) protests over her marriage, Persephone fulfilled her role as Goddess of the Underworld, sometimes even displaying more power than Hades himself.

Here is the influence of the Pluto we know, secretive, controlling, manipulative. The story of Persephone is illustrative of the lies, obsessions and jealousy as any one subject to Venusian, Scorpionic and Plutonic forces, the epitome of Venus in Scorpio.

As with all those under the influence of a Pluto influenced Venus, Persephone epitomizes the archetype of transformation. From innocent goddess of the spring to the queen of the underworld, Persephone held the promise of life and ultimately the promise of the life to come.


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The Astrology of Venus in Scorpio: Persephone and Pieces of Rose, Part 1

(Astrology Explored) Venus in Her Courses

Shortly Venus in the heavens to retraces her steps in retrograde motion. In the divine dance of our heavenly sister around the Sun inside our own orbit around it, she appears to move, stop, and move backwards and forward again. The ancients, in their observations of the brightest star in our heavens noted the complex motion that appears from our perspective on earth over the course of time to trace a pentagram and also a rose.

These are potent symbols, imbedded in our psyches as well as our tarot cards, archetypes of life and love.

The orbit of Venus is profoundly tied with the life cycle of humans. Venus usually moves through a sign in twenty-eight days, matching the lunar month, and a woman’s menstrual cycle. Being within 48 degrees of the Sun’s position at all times, the only major aspect she can make to the Sun is the conjunction which she does every nine months, the length of a human pregnancy. She has been at turns associated with war by the Sumerians and the Maya, and with sensual love by the Romans and the Greeks. Galieo discovered that Venus could be viewed in phases, like the moon, which smashed the idea that the planets revolved around the earth. She could only be thus viewed if she moved around the Sun. So it was that Venus can be seen in the same manner as the moon, moving from “birth” to “death”.

Orbit of VenusVenus turns back onto her orbit, we are driven to look at events in our past. Venus in Scorpio is a darker Venus than most, delving into our deepest selves. We suspect or perceive the manipulations of others. Relationships with old lovers or significant women are examined with aching compulsion. We are driven to explore relationships that are magnetic in their draw, obsessive in their nature. If we are open enough, we find our own fatal flaw, and if not, find the fatal flaw in others. The story that best illustrates Venus in Scorpio is the tale of the Rape of Persephone, a tale that lay at the heart of the Eleusian Mysteries, a religion of the Greek culture that featured a risen god, established at least 1,500 years before the birth of Christ.

The Back Story of the Rape of Perspephone

Persephone, the daughter of the earth mother, Ceres was raped and forced marriage to Hades. Persephone was gathering flowers in a field, out of her mother’s site when Hades caused the ground to open up and he swept her into his chariot and took her down into the Underworld. As with all things Plutonian, Hades saw what he wanted and took it.

This story marks a period in human history where matriarchal cultures who worshipped the Goddess were overturned. This happened by stunning earth changes (the Theran volcanic explosion around 1600 B.C.) and the invasion of the warrior civilization the Mycenaeans.

Barbara Hand Clow wrote this story of Medea, “The Search for the Golden Fleece”

“. . .The violence of the Earth in my times were beautiful like the wild, wild wind. The Earth crunched and groaned so that the rocks became molten liquid. The water rose so high . . . The volcano was of such violence, the earthquakes shook all that was left in your soul; and then men decided to never trust again.”

The destruction of the powerful matriarchal Minoan civilization centered on Thera marked the first throws of the end of the Bronze Age that existed during the Age of Taurus. We see how slowly astrological ages turn over the reigns of power in the story of the Myceneans, the northern tribe that overtook and redefined Greek culture from 1600 B.C. to their eventual decline at beginning of the Iron Age around 1100 B.C., the Age of Aries. Though historians disagree with the reasons behind the collapse it is said that the Myceneans could not withstand the attacks of invading Dorians who wielded technologically superior iron swords.

In Clow’s rendition of Medea’s story and her part in the Quest for the Golden Fleece, Medea’s mission was to restore the balance of female/male energies due to imbalance caused by the earth changes. In this quest, Jason was forced to kill Medea’s brother, a sacred prince, and Medea killed her uncle to secure the throne of Pagasea for Jason. But these murders poisoned the intent of the quest. Jason refused the throne secured by matrilineal descent, looking “for a better throne”. Jason’s refusal to take the offered throne shattered the last hope for a sacred kingdom based on the king as protector of home and hearth. The trust between man and the Goddess was broken, earth was not blessed, and the imbalance remained. Jason was thus banished by the priestesses of the Moon that raised him.

From that point the power of women was diminished. Athenian women lost the vote, the war goddess Innana morphed in the playgirl Aphodite, the gods did not invite an ancient goddess, Eris, to an important wedding, and Hades was allowed to make off with the Earth goddess’ daughter and force her to be his wife.

Tomorrow: The Story of Ceres

Image of Roses courtesy of Photobucket user GreenWhite

Image of Venus Orbit published under a Creative Commons license from from Wikipedia


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The Astrology of Evolution: Saturn, Uranus, Pluto At It Again

castration-of-uranus2
The Sun in Virgo marches on the join Saturn in his long-term position, shining its light on Old Man Time who is and has been in opposition to Uranus. At the apex of T-Square is the original change agent, Pluto, commanding a position as middleman. This is a story as old as time, the struggle of new power systems against the old.

Once the supreme ruler of the Gods, Uranus, was the son of the primordial goddess, Night. Called the god of the Sky, Uranus presided over a human race that was morally pure, that did the right thing naturally. Uranus made the Earth, Gaia, his wife and mated with her each night. However, he hated the children of Gaia, most of who were monstrously formed. He imprisoned them and Gaia hated him for it. She devised a plan to free her children by persuading, one child, Saturn to dethrone his father. The Earth Mother gave him a flint sickle with which Saturn attacked his father, castrating him and destroying his procreative power.

Flint sickles were used before the development of metal implements. During the late Stone Age Neolithic humans domesticated wild cereals and grains, became farmers and left their hunter-gatherer ways behind. It is theorized that during the hunter-gatherer phase and through the entire Neolithic phase humans operated cooperatively but did not have the capacity for self-awareness, what is call the bi-cameral mind. Instead, mental processes of early humans operated in a state where independent thought was perceived as the voice of god. Thus humans perceived an ongoing and intimate relationship with god where god directly controlled their actions.

The difference between this ancient father/son pair is that while Uranus assumed his role as the primordial “father sky” instinctually, commanding the collective naturally, Saturn used conscious intent to command control. As hunter-gatherers, humans reacted to the environment, “naturally,” while as farmers assumed more control and organization over their environment. As the survival strategies of humans changed, their gods changed too signaling an evolving, though not a fully evolved, consciousness.

As “the son” Saturn faces “the father” Uranus in the sky, the push pull of imposed order over primordial collective instinct plays out once again. Interestingly enough, Saturn is one point of a Yod, called the finger of God, pointing directly at Saturn’s usurper, Jupiter, who was called Zeus by the Greeks. Uranus is in Aquarius, indicating a destined change in the collective consciousness. Pluto in Capricorn is the signal a change from the old economic and political systems to the new. Having evolved past the bicameral mind to conscious thought, from collective group action to the rise of the individual, what evolution awaits us now?

sept-15-2009

If you would like a question answered on these pages send your birth date, birth place and birth time along with your question to starrynightastro@aol.com. Sorry, time constraints prevent me from doing readings on anything other than a single question.

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